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How Much Current Can an Electrical Line Carry?

Posted by Dr. P. Andrew Karam on 4/20/2016

Boy – there are so many answers to this question, but the best is “It depends.” What it depends on primarily is the design of the electrical line – a high-tension power line is going to carry much more current than will the feeder line to an office (or apartment) building, and that feeder line will carry more juice than the line that runs to your home is going to carry. So the best answer, again, is “It depends.” But more important is that you have got to keep your electrical loads comfortably within the carrying capacity of your electrical lines, whether that’s the line feeding your home, your business, your shop, or whatever it is that you’re wiring up. In fact, you really shouldn’t exceed about 80% of the rated capacity of any electrical line, just to be safe. Also – and this is important – you should never try to push an electrical line (or fuse box or breaker box) beyond its rated capacity.

Carbon Monoxide Factsheet - Download for Free

Posted by admin on 4/13/2016
Download this free Carbon Monoxide Factsheet from OSHA.

Free OSHA Fact Sheets, InfoSheets and Hazard Alerts

Posted by admin on 4/13/2016
Free OSHA Fact Sheets, InfoSheets and Hazard Alerts

Ashley Furniture and its OSHA Violations

Posted by admin on 4/1/2016
Making the rounds in the news the past few months has been Ashley Furniture and its OSHA violations. OSHA has again cited Ashley Furniture Industries Inc. for alleged safety violations at one of its Wisconsin factories, saying the company failed to protect workers from moving machine parts.

Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Download OSHA Form 300, 300A, and 301

Posted by admin on 4/1/2016
OSHA requires that nearly all employers maintain properly-recorded accounts of work-related injuries and illnesses. Forms 300, 300A, and 301 will help you comply with this requirement.